Health and the Environment

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Protecting Wellness

Just as humans affect the environment, the environment affects humans. Penn State researchers are collaborating on ways that human health is being impacted, from pollution and toxins to infectious disease and climate change.

Systems In Sync

Dynamics of disease, environmental change, and gene-environment interactions have been affecting human, animal, and plant health for decades. From indoor pollution to infectious disease to climate change, health is being impacted.

Researchers are addressing these important factors in order to disrupt infectious disease vectors, enable precautionary design of chemicals and materials, and develop medical treatments to minimize negative impacts.

Scientists are also identifying an increasing number of beneficial human/environment interactions, including the microbiomes in our digestive systems and on our skin.

Penn State continues to grow in this area with the College of Health and Human Development's focus on Environmental Health Sciences.

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A team of Penn State researchers is collaborating on a potential new method to treat cancer by delivering a unique nanoparticle to a localized cancerous area in mice and activating the treatment through light exposure
IEE cofunded faculty member Adam Glick and a team of Penn State researchers are collaborating on a potential new method to treat cancer by delivering a unique nanoparticle to a localized cancerous area in mice and activating the treatment through light exposure.

Health and the Environment Research

 

Featured IEE Researchers

Department Head and Professor, Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Associate Professor, Political Science

Health and the Environment News

Featured Stories

Intensifying heat waves threaten South Asia’s struggling farmers – many of them women

| theconversation.com

As crops fail in the rising heat, men are leaving many rural areas for migrant work in cities. Women are left to tend to the farming in increasingly dangerous conditions.

Microbes clean pollution from abandoned mines

| wpsu.psu.edu

Penn State professors Jennifer Macalady and Bill Burgos lead an interdisciplinary team researching newly discovered microbes capable of rapid removal of toxic metals in acidic environments.