Penn State Energy and Environment News

Opportunity: ARISE at Penn State: Anthropological Research in Science Education

Anthropological Research in Science Education (ARISE) at Penn State is a new summer institute in integrated anthropological sciences for historically underrepresented and underserved undergraduate students from across all Penn State campuses.

New director’s fund at Arboretum latest in philanthropic support

| news.psu.edu

Philanthropy has been the driving force in the creation, sustainment and growth of The Arboretum at Penn State, not only in relation to its size but also its program offerings. A new fund established in honor of Dr. Kim Steiner, recently retired founding director of the Arboretum, is the latest example of how philanthropy continues to positively impact the gardens.

Monitoring glucose levels, no needles required

| news.psu.edu

Noninvasive glucose monitoring devices are not currently commercially available in the United States, so people with diabetes must collect blood samples or use sensors embedded under the skin to measure their blood sugar levels. Now, with a new wearable device created by Penn State researchers, less intrusive glucose monitoring could become the norm.

Pennsylvania RGGI opponents mount tense last stand

| politico.com

Pennsylvania would be the first major fossil fuel producer to join RGGI, and it poses a crucial test of how the program might affect energy prices as the state seeks to cut emissions, experts say.

Human-caused climate change is already impacting 85% of global population, study finds

| wbur.org

A new study found that 85% of the world's population and 80% of the land are already impacted by human-caused climate change. Here & Now's Tonya Mosley talks with Richard Alley, a climate scientist at Penn State University.

First lecture in new series to focus on computing for more sustainable future

| news.psu.edu

Using computing power to create a better, more sustainable future will be the topic at the first Center for Artificial Intelligence Foundations and Scientific Applications distinguished seminar on Oct. 18. Carla Gomes, the director of the Institute for Computational Sustainability at Cornell University, will present a lecture on artificial intelligence and sustainability.

A new twist on 2D materials may lead to improved electronic, optical devices

| news.psu.edu

A new generation of electronics and optoelectronics may soon be possible by controlling twist angles in a particular type of bilayer 2D material used in these devices, strengthening the intrinsic electric charge that exists between the two layers, according to researchers from Penn State, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Rutgers University.

NASA is preparing for the ravages of climate change

| wired.com

The agency knows it needs to adapt to climate-driven events that will increasingly threaten coastal launch sites and other key space infrastructure.

Researchers receive grant to study pandemic's impact on greenhouse gas emissions

| news.psu.edu

A grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Program Office is allowing a Penn State-led research team to measure the rapid changes in greenhouse gas emissions that resulted from cities implementing stay-at-home measures to curb the transmission of COVID-19.

New Penn State consortium launches to help fuel the energy revolution

| news.psu.edu

A new consortium is working to examine the transformation of energy systems through holistic, unified processes that consider the whole energy portfolio versus addressing individual problems.

New garden at Penn State aims to fight food insecurity

| statecollege.com

Tomatoes, peppers, beans and greens — you’ll find them all at Penn State’s newest pocket garden. But aside from aside from adding a little color to campus, the garden looks to tackle the issue of food insecurity at University Park.

Rural Alaska has a bridge problem as permafrost thaws and crossing river ice gets riskier with climate change

| theconversation.com

Alaska is warming faster than any other U.S. state, and that’s causing problems, a team of bridge engineers and social scientists explains. The infrastructure bill in Congress would offer some help.