Penn State Energy and Environment News

Opportunity: Call for Penn State Drawdown Scholar REU Applications

The 2022 Penn State Drawdown Scholars Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program is currently accepting applications from outstanding students to conduct research on Drawdown solutions to reverse global warming.

Nanoscale window coating could help reduce energy costs

| psu.edu

Replacing single-pane windows with more energy-efficient double-pane windows can be costly — so a team of Penn State researchers examined the energy-saving properties of a single-pane window coating that would make replacement unnecessary.

Integrated modeling of climate impacts on electricity demand and cost

| psu.edu

A team of researchers led by Penn State has developed a coupled water–power–economy model to capture how the impacts of climate-related water stress and temperature changes can cascade through energy systems.

Entomologists to study how climate change may influence pollinator stressors

| psu.edu

A Penn State-led team of researchers will use a newly awarded $682,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture to examine how climate change may influence and interact with various stressors that affect the health of pollinators.

Biology fieldwork produces faculty- and student-authored research at Schuylkill

| psu.edu

Sarah Princiotta, assistant professor of biology, and Lucas Redmond, assistant professor of biology, use robust summer fieldwork programs to develop original research and opportunities for undergraduate students to get hands-on experience.

Penn State awarded $3.4 million contract to target plastic waste

| psu.edu

Penn State has been awarded a $3.4 million contract from the REMADE Institute to fund research targeting the inefficient methods currently used to process and upcycle mixed plastic waste.

Newly discovered carbon may yield clues to ancient Mars

| psu.edu

NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars on Aug. 6, 2012, and since then has roamed Gale Crater taking samples and sending the results back home for researchers to interpret. Analysis of carbon isotopes in sediment samples taken from half a dozen exposed locations leave researchers with three plausible explanations for the carbon's origin — cosmic dust, ultraviolet degradation of carbon dioxide, or ultraviolet degradation of biologically produced methane.

Farmers in 14 counties will be surveyed on their use of conservation practices

| psu.edu

If you're a farm operator in 14 central Pennsylvania counties, you now have a chance to highlight what steps you have taken to protect and enhance water quality for your local streams and the Chesapeake Bay.

Alaska scientists study accelerating land subsidence affecting coastal North Slope communities

| adn.com

Communities where permafrost is thawing and land subsiding are threatened by saltwater inundation and infrastructure loss. Scientists work to predict how conditions will change in the upcoming years.

Students encouraged to attend Spring Career Day and Stuckeman School Career Day

| psu.edu

Spring Career Day at Penn State gives students of any academic major or year the chance to learn about different industries, connect with leaders in their field, and jump-start their career. From 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Jan. 24 in the HUB-Robeson Center, nearly 200 companies will be recruiting for nontechnical full-time, technical full-time, internship and co-op positions.

White House seeks to hire 1,000 to focus on climate crisis

| cnbc.com

Michael Mann, professor of atmospheric science at Penn State University, joins Shep Smith to discuss a White House plan to hire 1,000 workers to focus on the climate crisis.

Penn State researchers aim to debunk myths surrounding spotted lanternfly

| stateimpact.npr.org

Researchers at Penn State are trying to set the record straight about the invasive spotted lanternfly. “The early lack of understanding about the spotted lanternfly, coupled with frustration, has led to the sharing of erroneous information, especially on social media,” said Julie Urban, associate research professor of entomology at Penn State.